social researcher | visual storyteller
F1090030.JPG

johannesburg: rupture through rapture

In my walking the streets of Johannesburg, I did not encounter a stable and totalized city. Johannesburg marks out divergent axes of action and temporality, and conjures multiple images, imitations and imaginations of an irreducible logic. Despite Johannesburg’s reputation as a destination of economic opportunity, I noticed a sense of yearning for certainty and stability amongst many who walk the streets. Walls and lampposts are adorned with symbols of mobility, sexuality, power, and insecurity super-imposed onto one another in an urbanscape engaged in incessant flux and movement. 

j_1.jpg
j_3.jpg
 These symbols are not only suggestive of a citizenry in search of assistance in their romantic, economic, social and spiritual lives. It also indicates the magnitude of the challenges some face in their daily efforts to survive in a city and socio-economic milieu of heightened uncertainty, precarity and paradox. How stability is conjured and maintained in such a climate, however, is a matter of personal preference and principle.

These symbols are not only suggestive of a citizenry in search of assistance in their romantic, economic, social and spiritual lives. It also indicates the magnitude of the challenges some face in their daily efforts to survive in a city and socio-economic milieu of heightened uncertainty, precarity and paradox. How stability is conjured and maintained in such a climate, however, is a matter of personal preference and principle.

j_4.jpg
j_5.jpg
 In following specific narratives and geographies across Johannesburg pertaining to specific members of amaZiyoni and amaNazaretha, this series explores the oscillating glimmers of religious performance – fragments of spiritual experience and imagination – as they are reflected in the streets of the inner city. As part of the ‘Johannesburg’ project, this series considers those churches that have stepped into the void of post-apartheid promises of democracy and equality in South Africa, and have begun to reorganise the everyday lives, mobilities and imaginations of both those in the city and the hinterland. 

In following specific narratives and geographies across Johannesburg pertaining to specific members of amaZiyoni and amaNazaretha, this series explores the oscillating glimmers of religious performance – fragments of spiritual experience and imagination – as they are reflected in the streets of the inner city. As part of the ‘Johannesburg’ project, this series considers those churches that have stepped into the void of post-apartheid promises of democracy and equality in South Africa, and have begun to reorganise the everyday lives, mobilities and imaginations of both those in the city and the hinterland. 

F1040031.jpg
F1090032.JPG
 In following specific narratives and geographies across Johannesburg pertaining to specific members of amaZiyoni and amaNazaretha, this series explores the oscillating glimmers of religious performance – fragments of spiritual experience and imagination – as they are reflected in the streets of the inner city. As part of the ‘Johannesburg’ project, this series considers those churches that have stepped into the void of post-apartheid promises of democracy and equality in South Africa, and have begun to reorganize the everyday lives, mobilities and imaginations of both those in the city and the hinterland. 

In following specific narratives and geographies across Johannesburg pertaining to specific members of amaZiyoni and amaNazaretha, this series explores the oscillating glimmers of religious performance – fragments of spiritual experience and imagination – as they are reflected in the streets of the inner city. As part of the ‘Johannesburg’ project, this series considers those churches that have stepped into the void of post-apartheid promises of democracy and equality in South Africa, and have begun to reorganize the everyday lives, mobilities and imaginations of both those in the city and the hinterland. 

F1120003.jpg
 These churches, whilst Christian in belief, were established in Africa by Africans - independent of those mission churches that had established themselves amongst the black working class population of southern Africa in the early 1900s - and welcome more syncretic  interpretations of evangelical Protestantism and divine faith healing.

These churches, whilst Christian in belief, were established in Africa by Africans - independent of those mission churches that had established themselves amongst the black working class population of southern Africa in the early 1900s - and welcome more syncretic
interpretations of evangelical Protestantism and divine faith healing.

F1090030.JPG
F1070009.JPG